Young-Nichols Funeral Home has been a part of the Tipton Community since 1852. We continue to provide you and your family with the service and care you deserve. If you ever have any questions, please reach out and we will be sure to get you the answers you seek.


The Very Beginning

April 12, 1852

The Very Beginning

William B. Young came from Ohio to Tipton by way of Jefferson County, Indiana. Young started learning the cabinet trade business while in Jefferson County   and after arriving in Tipton on October 12, 1850,  he first worked for his brother-in-law, John S. Anderson. After 18 months with Anderson, Mr. Young decided to go into business for himself and in 1852 he rented a log cabin and opened the first undertaker business in Tipton. Along with his undertaking business, William also continued making cabinets and household furniture.

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Change of Hands

May 5, 1881

Change of Hands

After returning from duty in the Civil War, William built a planing mill in Tipton in 1874. A planing mill is a facility that takes cut and seasoned boards from a sawmill and turns them into finished dimensional lumber. In January 1881, he decided to devote all of his time to the mill and sold his furniture and undertaking business to his son, Seneca. Seneca G. Young was born in 1849 and started working for his father in 1875.  Seneca built a new building on the front of the lot at 119 W. Jefferson Street to house the S.G. Young Furniture Company and Undertaking Establishment. Later it became known as Young’s Furniture Company

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The Introduction of the Nichols

January 1, 1893

The Introduction of the Nichols

In 1893, a Riply County native by the name of Phillip E. Nichols came to Tipton and purchased half interest in a business, which became known as the Reed & Nichols Furniture & Undertaking Firm. In 1895, Phillip Nichols accepted employment with the S.G. Young Furniture & Undertaking Company.

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2nd Generation Nichols

June 1, 1925

2nd Generation Nichols

In the mid-1920’s, Robert F. Nichols joined his father’s furniture & undertaking business. Robert F. Nichols was born in 1907 and was the only son of Phillip E. and Margaret Nichols. Later, Robert and his wife, Evelyn, would purchase the home at 216 W. Jefferson Street to be used as the funeral home. The purchase of this house was necessitated by the new Indiana Law requiring embalming to be done in a funeral home after 1935. Prior to this law, embalming could be done at a private residence, which was common practice among funeral homes at the time. The home purchase by Robert & Evelyn is the basic structure still in use today.  

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3rd Generation Nichols

May 5, 1957

3rd Generation Nichols

The third generation of the Nichols family to enter the business was Philip V. Nichols. Philip joined the family business in 1957 after graduating from mortuary school and becoming an embalmer and funeral director.  In 1963 the corporation sold the furniture part of the business to Ralph Parsons and the funeral home was enlarged with the addition of a new embalming room, casket display room, garage, and larger area in the viewing room. During this same time the name was changed from Young’s Furniture Company, Inc. to Young-Nichols Funeral Home, Inc.  Philip’s wife, Mary Alice (Kinder) Nichols, began working in the family business full-time in 1980 and continued there until she passed away in July 2009.  Philip continued to be active in the business until his death in 2012.

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4th Generation Nichols

May 5, 1982

4th Generation Nichols

Phil & Mary Alice coordinated another major expansion and remodeling of the home in 1982 just as their sons Bob and Brad were finishing school and preparing to enter the business. The interior of the building was redecorated and more space was added to the viewing area. A colonial look with tall white pillars was added to the front of the home. Robert L. “Bob” Nichols graduated from mortuary school in February 1982 and returned to the family business. Philip Bradley “Brad” Nichols graduated from mortuary school in 1983. Brad Nichols Bob Nichols

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Continuous Improvement

August 5, 1993

Continuous Improvement

Other major improvements to the facilities included the demolition of the house directly west of the funeral home in 1993 for the addition of a 35-space parking lot. In 1994, the offices were expanded and a handicap lift was installed and the interior of the home was also redecorated at this time. In March 2000, the casket display room was remodeled under a new concept which displays casket segments instead of the whole casket. This allows us to display more caskets in less space. The unused space was converted into an arrangement office.

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